Teacher Feature #40 – The year in review

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For many schools in Canada, the school year ends this week. Both students and teachers are eagerly looking forward to holidays. However, before closing the books for good, I suggest an important exercise to engage both staff and students is to reflect on the past school year. What classroom activities worked best? Which projects really engaged students? Were there other ways that concepts might be introduced which would improve learning?

Reflection - June 2014
Teacher Feature #40 – Peter Drucker – June, 2014

Many educators, at the end of the term or the year, ask their students to provide feedback through either a paper and pencil exercise or through an on-line survey. Some teachers find it beneficial to ask students, at the year end, to write a note to the next year’s students suggesting how best to succeed in this particular grade or class. Such peer-to-peer proposals can be very effective when these tips and strategies are shared with your new class of students in September.

Several year-end feedback activities are provided below:

Before concluding, I think that I should take a moment and reflect on my own past year. As a life-long-learner, I am so pleased that I have had the following opportunities:

  • To reflect on my own 60 years in the classroom as student, teacher and K-12 Educational Technology Consultant. My thoughts were shared in the December 18, 2013 post entitled “Educating With Technology: Changes for the Better”.
  • To attend the Manitoba Association for Computing Educators (ManACE) “Technology Information Nights” where I learn so much and get to meet such dynamic, and dedicated educators who are so willing to share.
  • To continue to be a member of the Manitoba Association of Educational Leaders (MAETL). With representation from nearly every school division in the province, the members of this organization continue to share technology implementation strategies as well as best practices to implement ICT throughout the K-12 continuum.
  • To attend the “Riding the Wave of Change” Conference in Gimli and my face-to-face meeting with Alan Levine (aka “CogDog”) who was my Digital Storytelling DS106 mentor.
  • To experience the innovative professional development that took place at EdCampWinnipeg
  • To learn and share through the powerful Wednesday night educational Twitter chats known as #mbedchat
  • To network and share ideas and resources with so many educational professionals. You know who you are … and for your friendship, I am ever thankful.

I think Henry Ford said it best …

Anyone who stops learning is old, whether at twenty or eighty. Anyone who keeps learning stays young. The greatest thing in life is to keep your mind young.

Take care & keep smiling :-)

Larger Image: Brian Metcalfe’s Teacher Feature “photostream”
http://www.flickr.com/photos/life-long-learners/

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Teacher Feature #39 – Start Today

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I admit it … I procrastinate. Even this month’s “Teacher Feature” is being posted, as evidenced by the above date, on the last day of the current month.  As a teacher and Educational Technology Consultant I found that the classroom structure and my commitments kept me focused on making deadlines. However, now that I am retired, I find it more challenging to regularly write and share ideas in a timely manner.

When I serendipitously came across Karen Lamb’s powerful quote below, I knew I had to share it with readers as it has particular relevance for both students and teachers.

Start Early - TF#39 - 400x300

Teacher Feature #39 – Karen Lamb – May, 2014

As the school year draws to a close, many students will be faced with completing major projects or even writing final exams. As a procrastinator, I often played “visualization games” with myself, whenever I prepared for exams or when I had to finish a major project or assignment. I would try to visualize what needed to be done to achieve my goal. For example, if it was June 1st and I had an exam or major assignment due on June 10th, I would pretend that today was actually the day before I wrote the exam or my project/assignment was due. In other words, I now had only 24 hours to prepare. I then would ask myself what were the critical tasks that needed to be done. In addition, I considered that, if I had more time, where should I have focused my energies? This strategy always helped me determine what was critical and what additional tasks would improve my final evaluation. It was then that I could imagine how lucky I was, to not have only 24 hours to prepare but several days to implement my necessary tasks. Regardless the key to such success was starting immediately.

When I was teaching a class of students, I was lucky that I could focus on the curriculum. However, today’s teacher has so many other responsibilities beyond the curriculum. Not only are they using technology to effectively engage their students, they are often so busy with many additional tasks which I will simply categorize as “administrivia”. It’s no wonder many teachers today lack the heart to try new initiatives or to attempt to learn with their students to use technology in new engaging ways.

However, I want educators to examine Karen Lamb’s statement and ask yourself …  Is there one additional change that I might implement which will improve my teaching or engage my students better next year? For example, I recently asked Zoe Bettess (@zbettess) at the “Riding the Wave of Change” Conference, what one technological innovation did she think had the most impact on her elementary students. Zoe felt that creating a classroom blog, using the free Kidblog, application, provided her students with a very powerful new learning tool.

So, as the current school year draws to a close, I ask my educational readers to reflect. I believe that reflection is a very important process that educators need to go through each year. Although there is only one month of classes left for most students in Manitoba, I encourage you to reflect on ways this year might have been made better. It’s unlikely that with only one month left, you will be able to make significant changes or improvements. However, I want you to play your own “visualization game”. Pretend it is June, 2015 and you have had an exceptional year where you and your students have learned together in a wonderful, supportive “family atmosphere”. What changes did you make during the 2014-15 school year that fostered such improvements? Were there any other changes or strategies that you could have employed to improve the learning even further?

The good news is that rather than having only one month to make these changes to improve learning in your classroom, you indeed have an entire school year.

The key is to start thinking about it today so that “a year from now”, it will be reality.

Take care & keep smiling :-)

Larger Image: Brian Metcalfe’s Teacher Feature “photostream”
http://www.flickr.com/photos/life-long-learners/

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PA “Interruptions” Inspire Innovation

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Nadia Nevieri and her students of Lakewood School have provided amazing connections with each other and their community through an innovative educational endeavour. The creation of 1-2 minute “Lakewood Live”  videos provide an engaging vehicle for transmitting daily events and happenings within the school and community.

  Pardon this interruption

I was so lucky to attend a Manitoba Association for Computing Educators (ManACE) Technology Information Night last February. True, I did get a free supper of pizza, salad, and a soft-drink, together with a chance to network with other educators from several Manitoba school divisions. However, I was delighted to learn about practical, classroom-based innovations from three remarkable educators. I was particularly excited by the learning potential of an endeavour that Nadia Nevieri (@nnevieri) shared in her presentation entitled “Video Killed the PA Star”.

As educators, many of us have experienced daily public address (PA) announcements which did not, at times, “connect” with the intended audience, be it students or staff. How many of your students continually want to be updated on PA items they may have missed? How many great lessons have been interrupted by an administrator announcing an added, or overlooked, bit of information that perhaps had more relevance with other specific classrooms other than yours? Does your Phys Ed teacher use the PA system to announce new activities, game changes, and last minute information?

Now, I’m not advocating that we should remove the public address system from all our schools. Rather, I’m suggesting that perhaps there might be other ways of conveying information in a flexible manner that engages the audience, be it students, staff, or parents.

“Lakewood Live” is the name of the daily video announcements which are shared throughout the K-5 grades in Lakewood School and the nearby community. Although Nadia teaches grades 2/3, she has many of the older grade 4 and 5 students engaged in making the daily videos. In fact, what I like about her instructional model, is that it could be used by older students with equal success. Furthermore, Nadia has provided her student video production team with the two important qualities of “student voice” and student responsibility.

To provide readers with the “big picture” and to help you better understand what Nadia and her amazing students have accomplished, I encourage you to view the January 13th “Lakewood Live” daily video announcement below:

[YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e5_CicS2xI4]

So that readers can appreciate the different formats of “Lakewood Live”, Nadia shared the following three additional episodes with me:

Replicating the Remarkable

To help you better understand the important logistics behind how the “Lakewood Live” videos are created, I will try and share the following generic steps (in bold italics). Where possible, I will append (in regular text) strategies and techniques that Nadia and her student team employed. Often it is these “behind the scenes” tasks that are so critical to the success of a new, educational learning venture:

  • Make certain to gain parental permission allowing student names and/or faces to be displayed in a YouTube video. When this endeavour was first proposed to parents, of the 228 Lakewood students, less than a handful did not want their son or daughter to be displayed in any media format that was shared on the internet.
  • Decide on the elements that might be included in a daily announcement video for your school. Start with a manageable number of items. You can always add new categories as the video announcement project matures. Some items will be repetitive such as which Patrol teams will be on duty for the week or which Mediators will be out on the playground. In such cases, a picture or video clip can be used repeatedly in subsequent weeks. Likewise having a picture of all staff members (with, perhaps, a quick bio) can be used at the start of each new term or at the start of a new year to help students better identify staff members.
  • Install an upcoming events chart in the staff room and encourage colleagues to complete items before each video publication deadline. From this events chart, Nadia and her student video production team compile the items that are to be shared in the upcoming week’s five videos.
  • Empower students and/or staff to capture video snippets or images that can be as the backbone of your daily announcements. Obviously, student birthday announcement pictures can only be used once per year, but many others can be used on a regular basis. Those investigating the creation of video announcements for next year, might consider preparing now by collecting generic photos or video snippets around your school during May and June.
  • Create and continually add or refine news elements. Perhaps you might want to explore adding categories like “guess this book”, “joke of the day” or “Fun Fridays”. Would your students be interested in learning how to incorporate a green screen?  Empower your video production team to research and to explore how a green screen might be used in your classroom to enhance daily news videos.
  • Create a script template for announcers to utilize.
  • Meet with students to shoot the next week’s announcements. Nadia meets with her “Lakewood Live” video production team for one hour after school each Wednesday. During this hour they shoot the upcoming week’s five daily announcement videos.
  • Blend elements into a daily announcement video and save results. Nadia and her students use iPads to capture images and photos and she inserts these news items into an iMovie template that she has created and refined. She indicated that she spends no more than 30 minutes compiling segments for each video.
  • Upload the upcoming week’s daily news stories to YouTube in a manner that protects privacy. Nadia uploads the five videos for the upcoming week over the weekend. She ensures that each of her YouTube announcement videos are uploaded with an “Unlisted” privacy setting rather than the usual “Public” category. This process reduces the chance of individuals finding the wealth of school’s daily news videos by searching YouTube or Google for “Lakewood Live”.
  • Provide the daily link to students, staff and parents from another web site. Readers may be interested in seeing more episodes of the “Lakewood Live” videos by visiting the following link which is used to share the daily Internet address (URL) to the respective YouTube videos:

http://mylakewoodlive.blogspot.ca/

Once the daily announcement video is uploaded and the particular link is shared through the above Blogger web site, teachers have flexibility as to when, during the day, to share the video “news” with their students. Nadia suggests that if she forgets to show the daily video, she has several students in her class who are more than willing to remind her. Not only are the students and staff more informed, so are the parents and community.

Undoubted, Nadia was so very impressed with her student production team and their engagement in the learning process. However, it was something that Nadia said in passing that really resonated with me. She indicated that, in addition to the increased responsibility and student voice that her production team demonstrated, she was allowed to see students in “a different light” than in the typical classroom situation. This “Lakewood Live” endeavour allowed Nadia to better understand individual students and see their hidden talents.

Could we, as educators, wish for anything more?

Take care & keep smiling :-)

Credits:

- Flickr – Creative Commons image “Angelica Jordan’s classroom” by the Herald Post
- https://www.flickr.com/photos/heraldpost/5169295832/

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Teacher Feature #38 – Pupils, Photos & Privacy

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My older son shared the following photograph with me recently. It was shared as a entry on “theCHIVE” entitled “Little known facts that you likely never knew” on April 18, 2014.

bizarre-facts-7

Admittedly, I was not sure how accurate this information might be. However, in researching this quotation, I was amazed at how the number of photos taken is estimated and more importantly delighted with the wealth of powerful photos that have been captured over the years and shared through the following sites:

  1. How Many Photos Have Been Taken Ever?
  2. 40 Of The Most Powerful Photographs Ever Taken
  3. How many photos have ever been taken

However, the following quotation, from the third site, got me thinking about our pupils and their privacy.

… but this year people will upload over 70 billion photos to Facebook, suggesting around 20% of all photos this year will end up there[7]. Already Facebook’s photo collection has a staggering 140 billion photos, that’s over 10,000 times larger than the Library of Congress.[8]

If today’s students are actively using social media and apps such as Facebook, Flickr, Instagram and YouTube, they are indeed socializing and sharing photos. We need to help our pupils understand that once the door to one’s private world is opened, it may be difficult to close.

This idea prompted this month’s Teacher Feature remix.

Teacher Feature 38 - Alan Dershowitz - 400x300

Teacher Feature #38 – Alan Dershowitzi – April, 2014

Once again my older son shared the following stats from yesterday’s “theCHIVE” post entitled, “Mind blowing stats popular websites pull each minute”:

  • YouTube users upload 72 hours of new video every minute
  • Facebook users share 2,460,000 pieces of content every minute
  • WhatsApp users share 347,222 photos every minute
  • Instagram users posts 216,000 new photos every minute
  • Vine users share 8,333 videos every minute

True, I realize that many photos can be shared or uploaded that do not reveal any private matters. In fact, our younger son use Instagram to showcase only his best digital photos. He tends to use this social networking application as a digital portfolio to display his creativity.

However, these questions need to be discussed with our students to help them protect their privacy:

  • What is privacy?
  • What is your digital footprint & what does it look like?
  • As an employer, would I hire/fire you after Googling your name?
  • Are your sharing information that you consider private?
  • Are you sharing information that others may consider private?
  • What steps would you go through to have a picture or comment removed from the web?

In closing, I will leave you with two quotations from MediaSmarts – Canada’s Centre for Digital & Media Literacy. In the article entitled “Online Privacy, Online Publicity: Youth do more to protect their reputation than their information”, Matthew Johnson states:

… young people may not care that much about what we think of as privacy, but they care very much about control – control over who can see what they post, over who can track them digitally and, most especially, over how other people see them.

and …

Canadian youth do care about privacy, and are willing to learn and use tools for managing it. Their poor understanding of data privacy, however, leaves them vulnerable to privacy invasions that they may not even be aware of.

As educators, we do, indeed have an important role to play.

Take care & keep smiling :-)

Larger Image: Brian Metcalfe’s Teacher Feature “photostream”
http://www.flickr.com/photos/life-long-learners/

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Teacher Feature #37 – Video Viewpoints

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How can we move students from being passive consumers to active producers? One way is to provide students with the opportunity to create videos. Students, that I have worked with, are eager to demonstrate their creativity through digital storytelling and the power of pictures.

This month’s Teacher Feature remix was inspired, by the following tweet, shared by Dean Shareski.

Teacher Feature # 37 - Dean Shareski

Teacher Feature #37 – Dean Shareski – March, 2014

As a teacher and technology consultant for the Prairie South School Division in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Dean was always about sharing and connecting. Currently Dean is the Community Manager for Discovery Education Canada.

Dean has motivated me, and many other educators world-wide, with his willingness to share resources and educational insights through his Ideas and Thoughts blog. In the Videos section of his blog, Dean feels that “as teachers we have become text prejudice. We focus so much on reading and writing and forget that most of what our students take is in the form of video”.

I have maintained that educators learn best when they first explore software or create a digital story for their own personal needs. Regardless of whether one creates their first Excel spreadsheet to record game data in their child’s soccer league, or a PowerPoint presentation for a wedding reception, or a digital story to share at the passing of a loved one, the learning effort invested in this meaningful,  personal task will eventually move to one’s classroom to engage and benefit students.

This personal approach is evident when one peruses Dean’s approach to digital storytelling or creating videos. Many of his video adventures are created outside the educational arena. Whether it is was the Happy Birthday Alec Couros lipdub or a I Have Cancer (as a series of cancer victim videos), or a Mother’s Day Tribute, Dean practices what he preaches through creating and sharing his amazing videos. In addition, to creating powerful, educational videos like Sharing: The Moral Imperative as a keynote presentation for the K12 Online conference, Dean often creates informative “behind the scenes” videos. For example, The Making of Sharing: A Moral Imperative gives viewers many important tips and strategies that can be used to improve their own video creation techniques.

I must admit that I was inspired to  choose Dean’s quotation as part of this month’s Teacher Feature remix because yesterday I had an opportunity to read Dean’s latest blog entry. For Dean’s 50th birthday, Alec Couros and Diana Williams decided to utilize social media to play a prank entitled “Let’s Sock It To Dean Shareski”. Recipients were encouraged to send, via snail mail, a pair of socks to Dean’s home address. At last count, Dean received 86 pair of socks from all across North America and even, as far away as, Australia.

I wasn’t surprised at all to see how Dean acknowledged receipt of the various pairs of socks in his #Socks4Dean post. True to form, he created a Google Map showing where his various “sock senders” live, a time lapse video with Dean and his dogs opening all 52 packages, and a SlideFlickr presentation showing Dean together with each pair of socks.

In closing, I encourage you to allow your students, like Dean, to express their passion and creativity through digital storytelling and the making of videos.

Take care & keep smiling :-)

Larger Image: Brian Metcalfe’s Teacher Feature “photostream”
http://www.flickr.com/photos/life-long-learners/

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Teacher Feature #36 – A love of reading

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February is “I love to read” month. As an experienced educator, I realize just how important a skill reading can be. In fact, one of the greatest gifts teachers can share with their students is a love of reading.

To pay tribute to this important idea, I chose to create the following remix. The two youngsters below are not only sharing a book but are also sharing B. F. Skinner’s important message.

Teacher Feature #36 - 400x332

Teacher Feature #36 – B. F. Skinner – February, 2014

I admit that I enjoy reading. I often delay visiting a theater to take in a popular show until I have read the book which inspired that particular movie. My reason for this approach is that I like to form my own mental images while reading the book, rather than be initially influenced by the movie director’s interpretation.

Yes, I do enjoy a good book. However I must admit that, this was not always the case. As a rather naive junior high student, I remember in English class being forced to read a “great book” of which I had little interest. In frustration, I remarked to a friend, “When I finally graduate from Grade 12, I will never have to open or read another book!” Thankfully, my outlook changed as I enrolled in university and later graduate courses where research and reading were definitely required. However, because I had some choice in the direction of my research, I soon appreciated how important reading was as part of my overall knowledge acquisition. In fact, I began to appreciate reading more and more as I grew older.

As Francis Bacon stated, “Age appears to be best in four things; old wood best to burn, old wine to drink, old friends to trust, and old authors to read.”

Take care & keep smiling :-)

Larger Image: Brian Metcalfe’s Teacher Feature “photostream”
http://www.flickr.com/photos/life-long-learners/

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Teacher Feature #35 – Curiosity

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“Information at your fingertips” can be a detriment to teaching. Don’t get me wrong. As an educator, I appreciate the ease at which Google, and other search engines, serve up results to the inquiring minds of today’s students. However, I believe there are times when students, who are engaged in a problem-solving task, should have to struggle to find the answer. Too often, students who need to hone their problem solving skills are too ready to give-up and search for the answer on-line.

Some of my fondest memories of classroom teaching involved activities where students struggled to find a solution to a problem and explored a variety of paths before selecting a final outcome. I still remember the glint in their eye as curiosity motivated students to seek out a solution.

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Teacher Feature #35 – William Arthur Ward – January, 2014

Over the next few weeks, I hope to be able to share with you some problem solving activities which I believe will engage your students. Undoubtedly, you will have to insist that all your students turn-off their cell phones and refrain from going on-line in an attempt to solve these challenges. However, it is my hope that you, too, will ignite the flame of curiosity in the eyes of your students.

Take care & keep smiling :-)

Larger Image: Brian Metcalfe’s Teacher Feature “photostream”
http://www.flickr.com/photos/life-long-learners/

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Teacher Feature #33 – What was war?

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Today’s “Teacher Feature” focuses on remembering. I have been reflecting on which moments in my life have left me with an indelible memory. For me, there are important images that come to life such as when I first met my wife, being present at the births of our sons, certain classroom “teachable moments”, outstanding family get-togethers, and images linked to various vacations.

Teacher Feature-33-What was war - 400x300

Teacher Feature #33 – Eve Merriam – November, 2013

Today’s remix was inspired by an unforgettable memory that I had while cycling through Holland. Although this experience happened more than 43 years ago, it left me an important memory and message that seems fitting to share with readers prior to November 11th. I encourage readers to view my YouTube video entitled “Are two minutes, too much, to ask?” to learn about my most unforgettable experience.

 [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=77TKyIU02gM]

What will you be doing … this 11th month, 11th day, 11th hour?

Larger Image: Brian Metcalfe’s Teacher Feature “photostream”
http://www.flickr.com/photos/life-long-learners/

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Teacher Feature #31 – Ask Questions To Learn

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Today’s “Teacher Feature” remix has a special connection for me. I have been lucky throughout my educational career, both as a student and as a teacher, to have usually felt confident enough to ask questions if I did not understand. For some students, this can be a challenging task. However, with human knowledge currently doubling every 13 months and, with IBM predicting in the next couple of years, knowledge will double every 12 hours, it will be impossible to know even a small amount of all the answers.

Ask Questions to Learn

Teacher Feature #31 – Chinese Proverb – September, 2013

Although I am able to increase my knowledge and tap into vast resources of information on the Internet, it is still my friends and colleagues in my Personal Learning Network (PLN) who help me find meaningful answers to my questions.

As teachers we should foster collaborative activities in our classrooms to encourage students to ask questions and learn as much as possible from their classmates.

Perhaps Bruce Lee said it best … “A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer.”

Take care & keep smiling :-)

Larger Image: Brian Metcalfe’s Teacher Feature “photostream”
http://www.flickr.com/photos/life-long-learners/

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Teacher Feature #30 – Focus on the Future

Food for Thought, Reflection, Teacher Feature 2 Comments »

As the Canadian school year officially draws to a close today, I thought I’d take time to reflect on the future.

The Future - Yogi Berra

Teacher Feature #30 – Yogi Berra – June, 2013

To help readers understand my “future perspective”, I thought I’d share the process I use to create my monthly “Teacher Feature”. My procedure is based on an activity I created called “Image with a Message“. I maintain a list of thought-provoking, educationally-related quotations. Whenever I wish to create a “Teacher Feature” image, I choose an appropriate quotation. Next, I use the Flickr advanced search process to select a Creative Commons-licensed image which gives one permission to “modify, adapt, or build upon”. After downloading the appropriate image, I insert it into PowerPoint, add the quotation and Flickr URL credit line, and save the resulting slide as a “Teacher Feature” image.

While searching my list for an applicable June “Teacher Feature” quotation, I thought that Yogi Berra’s statement about the future seemed fitting. In particular, the future of education has changed dramatically over the years as technology and the Internet resources have impacted on students and staff.

When I began teaching Grades 7 & 8 Mathematics, the future was so much simpler. As a new  teacher, I could focus exclusively on curriculum. For me, there were fewer non-classroom-related issues. By comparison, today’s teachers have to worry about a plethora of responsibilities and are often forced to teach a multitude of different subjects to a wide variety of student needs.

True, I did “network” and share resources and ideas with other Mathematics-teaching colleagues in our school. However, with the introduction of technology, the Internet, email, blogs and a host of social media apps, teachers today can “connect” with teachers within their same school with the same ease as like-minded teachers throughout the world.

Without a doubt, I believe the key to survival of overworked educators is to belong to a supportive Personal Learning Network (PLN). To better understand what my PLN means to me, I encourage readers to peruse my earlier post entitled “My PLN: A Teacher’s Resource“. In fact, it was a serendipitous sharing opportunity that motivated me to write about the power of joining a PLN to be better prepared for the future.

As you recall, I had already selected Yogi Berra’s quotation “The future ain’t what it used to be.” Normally, I would have proceeded to the advanced Flickr search to find an image that I could use to enhance the quotation. However, I first happened to check a series of tweets of individuals and educators that I follow on Twitter.

In scanning my tweet feeds, I was intrigued by the following “Cloud busting” message shared by Darren Kuropatwa. Darren is a talented Curriculum Coordinator for Digital Learning with the St. James Assiniboia School Division. When I clicked on the link in Darren’s tweet, his creative Instagram image was displayed.

Darren Kuropatwa Tweet

Darren’s innovative image of clouds, viewed through a pair of glasses, was a perfect image to complement Yogi Berra’s quote about the future. So, it was Darren’s sharing of his creative image, that motivated me to write this June’s “Teacher Feature”.

Below his innovative image of clouds viewed through a pair of glasses, Darren asks viewers “What do you see?” ….

I see educators connecting and sharing resources so that the future with technology can be an exciting place where students and teachers learn together.

Take care & keep smiling :-)

Larger Image: Brian Metcalfe’s Teacher Feature “photostream”
http://www.flickr.com/photos/life-long-learners/

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