Teacher Feature #38 – Pupils, Photos & Privacy

Food for Thought, Social Networking, Teacher Feature, Tip Add comments

My older son shared the following photograph with me recently. It was shared as a entry on “theCHIVE” entitled “Little known facts that you likely never knew” on April 18, 2014.

bizarre-facts-7

Admittedly, I was not sure how accurate this information might be. However, in researching this quotation, I was amazed at how the number of photos taken is estimated and more importantly delighted with the wealth of powerful photos that have been captured over the years and shared through the following sites:

  1. How Many Photos Have Been Taken Ever?
  2. 40 Of The Most Powerful Photographs Ever Taken
  3. How many photos have ever been taken

However, the following quotation, from the third site, got me thinking about our pupils and their privacy.

… but this year people will upload over 70 billion photos to Facebook, suggesting around 20% of all photos this year will end up there[7]. Already Facebook’s photo collection has a staggering 140 billion photos, that’s over 10,000 times larger than the Library of Congress.[8]

If today’s students are actively using social media and apps such as Facebook, Flickr, Instagram and YouTube, they are indeed socializing and sharing photos. We need to help our pupils understand that once the door to one’s private world is opened, it may be difficult to close.

This idea prompted this month’s Teacher Feature remix.

Teacher Feature 38 - Alan Dershowitz - 400x300

Teacher Feature #38 – Alan Dershowitzi – April, 2014

Once again my older son shared the following stats from yesterday’s “theCHIVE” post entitled, “Mind blowing stats popular websites pull each minute”:

  • YouTube users upload 72 hours of new video every minute
  • Facebook users share 2,460,000 pieces of content every minute
  • WhatsApp users share 347,222 photos every minute
  • Instagram users posts 216,000 new photos every minute
  • Vine users share 8,333 videos every minute

True, I realize that many photos can be shared or uploaded that do not reveal any private matters. In fact, our younger son use Instagram to showcase only his best digital photos. He tends to use this social networking application as a digital portfolio to display his creativity.

However, these questions need to be discussed with our students to help them protect their privacy:

  • What is privacy?
  • What is your digital footprint & what does it look like?
  • As an employer, would I hire/fire you after Googling your name?
  • Are your sharing information that you consider private?
  • Are you sharing information that others may consider private?
  • What steps would you go through to have a picture or comment removed from the web?

In closing, I will leave you with two quotations from MediaSmarts – Canada’s Centre for Digital & Media Literacy. In the article entitled “Online Privacy, Online Publicity: Youth do more to protect their reputation than their information”, Matthew Johnson states:

… young people may not care that much about what we think of as privacy, but they care very much about control – control over who can see what they post, over who can track them digitally and, most especially, over how other people see them.

and …

Canadian youth do care about privacy, and are willing to learn and use tools for managing it. Their poor understanding of data privacy, however, leaves them vulnerable to privacy invasions that they may not even be aware of.

As educators, we do, indeed have an important role to play.

Take care & keep smiling :-)

Larger Image: Brian Metcalfe’s Teacher Feature “photostream”
http://www.flickr.com/photos/life-long-learners/

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2 Responses to “Teacher Feature #38 – Pupils, Photos & Privacy”

  1. Phil Taylor Says:

    Great post Brian. At the recent Awakening the Possibilities Conference in Winnipeg, I attended a session by a privacy lawyer. The biggest violator of privacy is the individual. Very few people read the Terms of Service Agreement. From my experience, my students are more aware of this than many adults. Education is the key.

    Phil

  2. admin Says:

    Phil … Thanks for reinforcing the fact that “the biggest violator of privacy is the individual”. I am concerned that many students are acting in a manner today that may/will jeopardize their future. You, and educators like you, who explore and discuss privacy issues and proper software/application licensing, are to be commended. I would suggest that delving into social networking and related privacy issues with students is an important educational endeavour. I think most teachers would prefer that one important aspect of their teaching legacy was to help and protect the privacy of students. Such a focus, in my opinion, is much more important than teaching, for example, how to solve a quadratic equation, reviewing the Battle of the Plains of Abraham, or how to make a battery out of a lemon. I wonder if other readers agree with these thoughts?

    Take care & keep smiling :-) Brian

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